2009-07-02

I'm A Racist




Sometimes I receive comments on certain posts in which I am called a racist and told I hate White people, or Asian people, or some other race. I won't say I hate anyone due to race, but I am racist.

I admit when I hear White people make gross accusations about affirmative action, I assume them to be the White people who feel they are entitled, and always think for every black person in college, there is some White person who deserved it so much more, regardless of IQ, SAT scores, GPA, and whatever else that black person has.

I sometimes think white people have a belief they are entitled to opportunities in life, and that blacks who are "allowed" these opportunities are inferior.

I think asians and other races of folks look down upon black people in general.

I think many other races of people (Asian, Indian, Hispanic, etc.) aspire to be white and fit into mainstream society.

I think many Asian women suffer from what some Black men suffer from, which is "anything white will do" syndrome.

I think that Hispanics, in particular Mexican folks are some of the most racist people around.

I think that most White people are racist, but they can't accept or acknowledge that fact because it would be seen as negative in this day and age to be so.

I think that for White people when it comes down to certain things, race plays a bigger factor more than they care to admit, consciously or subconsciously.

I think that white women assume they are automatically more attractive than other races of women.

I think white people are way more aware of race than they let on.

Are these sweeping generalizations fair? No, they're not, and I know this. I am painfully aware that these cannot be proven to be absolutely true.

It's often said that black people can't be racist because we don't have the power to be so. I understand the general point of this belief, I really do. Typically speaking, my racist views aren't going to be obstacles to financial opportunities, education, or success to other races of people. If a white person holds racist views, I can understand that they are at more of an advantage deny me things, because right now in America, white people hold way more positions of power than other races of people.

I guess it could be said I am prejudiced. I know it isn't right be to prejudiced, or racist, but the truth is most people are, whether they admit it or not. I admit my prejudices. I think if most people did, race relations would be much better in America. I think that if people admit their prejudices, they can actually resolve their prejudices.

Many times these racist or prejudiced beliefs come from experience, at least that is where a lot of mine come from. When I start to think about these things, and how I feel, I often have to take a step back. I honestly don't know enough Asian people to make the determination that all Asian women love White men. I know that even if there are some white women who feel their whiteness is a positive attribute to their attractiveness, I know there are many who don't think that way. Even if some of my most negative experiences with race have come from Hispanic people, I can't deny that at one time my best friend was Hispanic, my husband's best friend is, and that not all Hispanics hate or dislike black people, and that Hispanics come in all races.

I can admit I have a problem, and that is my first step to remedying the situation. If I am aware of my prejudice I can work on it, but if I deny it, that means I don't want to change. Are people capable of changing?

67 comments:

revolution girl said...

If you're racist, I'm racist too.

I think a lot of the same things you do--scarily so even, but I don't think I'm inherently racist/prejudiced. I think as a POC--especially a black woman, we have to be ultra-aware of EVERYONE. Not only do black people have to be wary of ignorant white folks, we have to deal with crap from other POC as well who should be our "allies."

I'm still incredibly young, but right now I'm in my "all white people are racist until I get to know them, and even then they must be watched" phase. I am wary of every white person I meet--of their actions, words they use around me (like "girl" and "girlfriend"), comments about their "love for black people hair, etc. I am wary of the white guys and their intentions, if they realize I am intelligent and smart, and have a lot to offer or if I'm just some fetish or phase, an experiment (and I will never be anyone's experiment. I'm a person).

There's nothing wrong with your REALISTIC view of people and society; too many would like to believe we live in a colorblind society, and it will be their undoing. Or they're in for a terribly rude awakening.

Zek J Evets said...

i think everyone's capable of change. being prejudiced isn't a bad thing. as you said, we all have different beliefs, and many of them often have no basis in fact or truth, but our own experiences, which, admittedly, can make us biased to our own perspective and opinions.

but when we let those thoughts turn into actions - giving someone else the promotion, saying hurtful things, treating a person like they're inferior or incapable - then it becomes wrong. what you think matters only to you, but what you do is what affects other people.

you're right though, if people only admitted their prejudices, things would be so much easier. i mean, even on this blog we tend to act like because we're so aware of race/ethnicity that we don't make assumptions based on those factors, but we do.

yes, even me.

Anonymous said...

You know what's so sad? At the age you are at. There is no way that you should have to even worry about racism. With all the damn fighting blacks and other minorities have done to get our rights. There is no way you should have to feel like all whites are racist until proven otherwise. I can understand how you feel and have heard lots of black people say the same thing. I have to remember that we have only been give our full freedom since 1965.



I know you may feel all whites are racist, but there are actually some very good ones out there.

Mr. Noface said...

I like this post. We are all prejudice at varying degrees. Recognizing our prejudices is the first step to change-wait; let me say that better- recognizing that many of our prejudices are wrong and therefore a problem, is the first step to change.

G said...

Interesting post. I'm curious enough to ask what brought all of this on in the first place?

I think we're all guilty to a certain degree of having prejudices, be it about people in general (I work for a child protection agency and unfortunately, I have to a certain degree a prejudice/animosity towards that particular segment of the general public) or about a particular group.

But as you say, admitting that you have a problem with it, really is the first step in trying to change your attitude about it.

Jamdown said...

I don't think anyone cares whether or not you are racist. What matters is whether or not you have the power to enforce your racism. I think what you are expressing sounds more like stereotyping than racism. True racists don't dialogue with those they hate like you do (I saw the other posts where you allowed several racists to go back and forth with you. I doubt you could go on a racist website and do the same).

Anyone who says that they are completely prejudice-free is LYING. The only person who could claim to be racist/prejudice free lived on earth 2000 years ago.

However, I laugh whenever I hear White people saying that President Obama is racist. Yeah right. Even though President Obama is the most powerful man in the free world, he certainly seems to be racist/prejudice free, mainly because he is not fully Black or White, has Jewish friends & confidantes, and a Muslim background through his father. He's so mixed up in so many ways that he cannot help but to be tolerant. He's the only prominent person I can think of who I can put in the "seems non-racist" category.

Kaikou said...

I totally understand where you are coming from. I know I have my own prejudices, but awareness is key. It's the first set along with acknowledgment and knowing it's wrong.

People/humans are completely capable of change.

At the end of the day, not everyone will change or at the same time.

Surrounding myself with people who I love and can see through these unnecessary barriers has helped me.

Max Reddick said...

I think a lot of us feel the same way. Especially those of us of a certain age, the post Civil Rights generation who benefited most directly.

If I might speak from my own experience, I don't know exactly what to think. I mean, I have more opportunities that my parents ever had, but I can never get over thinking that I have to prove that I deserve that opportunity. I have to work twice as hard as everyone else just to remain relevant.

W are all stained by race in some way or another. But supposedly, race relations will get bet better generation by generation. I even read a theory that in a few years all Americans will be tan due to intermarraige between races, and at the point, we will have to find something else to use against one another.

Boom said...

Count me in because I agree with everything you wrote. And I'm not going to apologize for it.

uglyblackjohn said...

IMO - People make too much about race.
Someone doesn't like you? So what.
People look at you funny? Effum.

When one has things they need to get done, another's suppositions have little relavance in one's life.

A. Spence said...

I think everyone is racist. Everyone has their views, stereotypes and jokes about other races in someway shape or form.

Anonymous said...

I agree with pretty much everything you posted....and I know that I am not racist. I have standards, and, I am a critical thinker. See, for me, what I have experienced, when I go into 'relationships' or interactions with non-black folk, without my 'caution goggles' on, I invariably get smacked. What I have learned is that 'race' for nonblack folk, is their 'turetts' syndrome; they cannot help offending the black person.

For example, I carpool with a male, hispanic colleague; for the past six months we have had wonderful conversations about all things social, political, entertainment and sometimes racial. I was kind of unsure that I should engage topics about race with someone non-black, but, this past week I gave it a go. Would'nt you know it, he 'felt' comfortable using the 'n' word in a sentence! I was stunned, but kept my cool, because sad to say, I need the ride to work. I thought, surely he is aware of the 'rule' that no one is to utter that word unless permission is given, the relationship warrants it, or it is used as it was originally to be, a weapon of defense. He used it to make some point, (referencing the play/film Hair) when it was'nt necessary.
But, that's what I get for letting my guard down. I think that as African Americans, we are in a unique position, where our worldview, is pretty much a real one. We, unfortunately get to see people, for who they 'really' are, not as they hope to hide. (Nayo)

Kat said...

I don't care what people are/think, racist or prejudiced, as long as they don't put deliberate obstacles in my path that stops me from doing what I need to do.

macon d said...

Thank you for a thoughtful and honest post, and like others here, I saw alot of myself in it. One difference for me is that when it comes to white people, I try to think and talk and write in terms of common white tendencies among us. That avoids that mental and emotional blocker for white folks (especially newbies), the word RACISM. And even more than that, it puts the emphasis on things white people often do, rather than on who or what they supposedly are. Not a perfect strategy, but it seems to work better than having to smooth down hackles raised by that word.

Anonymous said...

I asked a friend of mine what she thought was better ... living in our time now, or 50 years ago.

Its rhetorical quesiton of course. Things are better now. However 50 years ago, you knew who your enemies were. These days you don't.

Like revolution girl. I am wary of every white person.

Sugabelly said...

You know what makes me sad? I didn't become racist until I moved to America.

Growing up in Nigeria was one of the most psychologically pure experiences of my life and I am thankful that I was allowed to develop in a place safe from racism.

Now I'm in college in America and I have to admit, I'm racist too. I cosign with everything you said, and like you, the views that I hold about all these people are based on EXPERIENCE.

I had never even heard of Affirmative Action before I came to America. Most people in Nigeria have no idea what that is or that it exists. In Nigeria education is taken very seriously and ALL children MUST go to school up to completing their Bachelor's degree as long as there is the means to send them to school.

I worked my butt off to get amazing SAT scores and got into schools in America only to be told during an argument with a White girl that the only reason I got into school was because of affirmative action.

Excuse me, but I don't even know what that is. My SAT scores were damn near perfect. All my exam grades were damn near perfect but this stupid girl that knows nothing about Nigeria sits there and discounts all my academic achievements just because I'm Black.

So yes, I am racist or prejudiced or whatever, and I DO think that White people think that somehow THEY are the ONLY ONES that deserve all these privileges and that anyone of another race that gets them is only being done a favour and is really a big inconvenience.

I know it's not everybody, but it's a damn big number.

FunkyStarkitty50 said...

It's crazy to dislike someone based on race because when you really get to know them, there are so many other things to dislike about them that actually do matter. My Dad for example, hated White people with a passion. Ok, so he grew up during Jim Crow and saw some terrible things. But he tried to poison my mind with his point of view that all White people hate all Black people and that you can never have a true relationship based on genuine respect or feeling because they don't see you as their equal. That was his reality during the 50's when race relations were at their worst. I could understand why he'd say that, but I didn't agree with it. At some time in your life, you have to make up in your own mind what you want to believe about someone is true. People stay prejudiced because they don't want to step outside of their comfort zone. It takes a lot of effort to get to know anyone especially if they are of a different racial background.There are good and bad people in every race, so you have to try to see each person as an individual.

Anonymous said...

I agree with everything you have written. I think and I believe I have said this before, that black people who are racist are actually reactionary racist. I don't believe there are black people walking around not liking white people because they feel they are inferior. I believe it's because of negative racist experiences with white people. White people are the majority and minorities are the ones trying to assimilate into their world. So I guess why would alot of white people change? They have nothing to gain by wanting things equal. So why fight a system that works so well for them? Most of them feel entitled to whatever they want and probably feel that they should not have to work as hard as minorities to get it. God forbid a minority gets a job that they feel they should have. Even if the minority does deserve it more than the white person. The first thing that comes into a white persons mind is affirmative action and personally I dont think they need to get rid of it anytime soon. White people constantly tell on themselves and why affirmative action should not be taken away when they open their big fat racists mouths. ALot of them don't believe no other race works harder and deserves more. Afterall they are white. And white is right.

Anonymous said...

God forbid a minority gets a job that they feel they should have. Even if the minority does deserve it more than the white person.
---

To many of them the very fact that you aren't white means that you DON'T deserve it. They like to speak about a meritocracy, but only when they think it bolsters their position. The truth is that many think they should not have to compete with blacks for ANYTHING. That this country was founded by whites and for the benefit of whites, and whatever blacks get should only be the castoffs, scraps and leftovers of whites. That their down-trodden, bedraggled, poverty-stricken, diseased and lice-infested European ancestors who came to these shores were noble and solely deserving of America's horn of plenty based on their whiteness alone.

Grata said...

WOW! I have been out for a while. My semester started and its intense. I need to go back and catch up on some convos.

Grata said...

Awwww! I just saw C1 in your updates. I have been thinking about him and wondering how he is doing. I guess he needed a break from all this craziness.

Grata said...

Great post.
I believe we are all prejudiced but the more power one has, the more they are likely to turn that prejudice into racism.

My worst racist experiences have been with Hispanics too.

Like someone said, everyone is suspect to me. And like you, I have friends across the board. But the general character of this society is to be governed by the totem pole.

So the general attitude towards Blacks is really racist and I have come to accept that as the reality. What Black people need to do more than ever is to build their communities as enclaves of serenity and peace from the rest of society. But this is not happening with the way the Black male is behaving.
A community can not be built by women alone. And its this lack of self preservation that gives more power to those that intend to oppress you. Why should anyone respect you if you have no sense of self preservation?

To be fair this society will dehumanize anyone in a vulnerable position of any color. To cope, those on a 'higher scale' will scapegoat Blacks to keep themselves in a higher position.

So it is not paranoid at all to be suspscious of everyone if you are Black. There are unwritten rules which dictate that everyone else is supposed to be above you.

Olen said...

Do any of you guys wonder why you even IR date since most of prejudices are based on truth? I do...

uglyblackjohn said...

@ Sugabelly - You are part of the brightest group in America today.
The girl who thought that you were here based on A-A was misinformed.
African immigrants out perform ANY other group in American school systems.

Anonymous said...

I mean seriously, I am what could be called, well could have been called, the 'Pollyanna' of the ghetto. I 'loved' everyone, black, white, hispanic, middle eastern, persian, native american, indian, asian, you name em, I wanted to talk to them, get to know them. I was literally singing, in my head, 'getting to know you', until..... reality.

How many white folk have I talked with about 'any darn thing', only to see affirmative action interjected out of the clear blue sky!

I so agree with, this statement,

"To many of them the very fact that you aren't white means that you DON'T deserve it." And, this goes for most, if not many-non blacks as well. Most, if not all non blacks, feel that blacks should be glad to be able to walk upright. I kid, but not really. I have earned a B.A., M.A. and a Phd, and I have white colleagues and students questioning my competence. Everyday. I'm human, but any mistakes, errors I make, are attributed testament to my incompetence as an African American. And many times I get this treatment even moreso from Hispanics. yikes. Some days I do not know how to act. Just being myself, does'nt appear to work lol!
I also agree with another poster who stated that many African Americans are in fact, 'reactionary racists'. This is really tough. And then, I think of our ancestors brought to these shores, and and great grandparents, going through the 'after slavery' era, Jim Crow, desegregation, and the Civil Rights Era. They survived long enough to make us. We shall prevail as swell. I hope.(Nayo)

Arnetta Green said...

This post is pretty much identical to my general viewpoint on race. Sadly, I have to admit that I have my own little prejudices when it comes to Black folk too. I always expect "us" to be the most judgemental and imposing. The few times that I have REALLY cut lose in life and tried new things, new foods, new anything it was always with my Asian and White friends. Black folk? Forget about it. (Just my experience)

Orchid said...

I agree with your post. Everything you stated has come to mind. I realize I have to make quite the effort to curb my thoughts while everyone around me thinks it's ok to say whatever they want about people who look like me and treat me as disrespectfully as they please. My boyfriend will get on me for getting angry and generalizing, but he will defend and make excuses for his dad who thinks that black people walk around feeling entitled and that I am example of that. I have only met the guy ONCE! Even if I seemed that way, why is it based on my skin color? Or his friend who says he will never date black or Muslim girls and also think that black people have squandered what MLK did for them. he doesn't have a single black friend.
It gets very painful, it wears away at you at times, but think victory comes from recognizing those thoughts and deciding "I am not going to generalize, but I will be wary." There is nothing wrong with being cautious, but we should let it hinder us from enjoying life.

Anonymous said...

Do any of you guys wonder why you even IR date since most of prejudices are based on truth? I do...

------------------------

I do sometimes. I try to keep in mind that not everyone is a racist. I do agree with you all about everyone having prejudice including me.

SIMONE

Anonymous said...

I will admit. I get tired. I get tired of always making sure I put in the extra effort so that white people know that they can feel comfortable around me because I am not a threat or that I am not angry, that I am friendly, very compassionate, accepting, and I try and listen and be supportive to just about everyone if they are deserving. I get tired because I sometimes feel like why can't we all just be human to each other. Instead we look for so many things to seperate us. I guess to a certain degree that comes natural. But how far do you take it? I have decided to only open myself up to people who are doing the same to me. No matter what color.

Grata said...

"I have only met the guy ONCE! Even if I seemed that way, why is it based on my skin color? Or his friend who says he will never date black or Muslim girls and also think that black people have squandered what MLK did for them."

This whole "you are where you are because of Affirmative Actiion" or you fell entitled, is 21st century racism and is just some few steps away from lynching.

It is founded on the racist beliefs of Black inferiority and its never going to go away.

If a Black person today single handendly built a vessel and made it to a far out planet, these people will will find a clever way of explaining that endevor that makes it a white accomplishment.

Racism has evolved and Black people will do well for themselves by keeping track of its varying phases.

You know who navigates this the white world perfectlly? The William Sisters. God bless and protect those girls.
I don't think there is any racial abuse other than lynching that these girls haven't endured. Yet, how much support does the BC give them ? Very little. I bet you if those where Black Brothers, you would continually have protests on most tournaments they play.
I like the way they have solidified their personal space and don't engage with most of those people in the Tennis world and still maintain their dignity. ANd also God bless their father. If only Black men could learn from that man.
I was shocked by Martina Navratilova dissing them. That woman was once my hero growing up but seeing her true racist colors was a reality check.
Leopards don't change their spots.

FunkyStarkitty50 said...

^^ I agree with Anon 8:07a.m. However, it's interesting when some White people see my sons or their Father, they tend to relax.I guess if I'm willing to have children with a WM, then I can't be that intimidating?? But why must I have to be put in a position to have to prove that I am one of the "nice ones"? I have been judged and stereotyped by White people, but I just can't say that all White people are going to be that way and yes, I do feel suspicious at times, depending on the situation, but when I get to know them then it's OK. The suspicion comes from my Dad as much as I hate to admit it. He instilled in me this thing where I always have to wonder what a White person I meet really thinks of me if I'm trying to get to know them.

Orchid said...

OOPS!
I meant "We should NOT let it hinder us from enjoying life".

Grata said...

I think people should pay close attention to Richard WIlliam's parenting style. Serously, that man got something we can all learn from if you intend to raise Black kids in this society.

Grata said...

OMG! Sid,
Have you seen this story.

Man offers 5 yr old Black Boy for sex

FunkyStarkitty50 said...

I read the story. That guy needs to be put under the jail. Obviously, he thinks that Black children are property that you can do what you want with, given the comments he made. That is disgusting. It's proof that they don't screen these people who say they want to adopt children. I guess since Black children are supposedly hard to place, they will sign the kids off on anyone who expresses interest and that is a shame. That poor child

Dark Moon said...

I’ve never sang the song of multiculturalism and Kumbaya because it has never existed. I have become more disenchanted as I got older because of many non-blacks rank arrogance and the impossible to silence meme of Black inferiority. It is woven into the fabric of the culture and it will remain a permanent fixture no matter how much people try to play up IR stats, and how the younger generation will save cultural relativism from hard lined older Whites and non-Blacks. If that was the case, then separate proms wouldn’t still be an issue http://theurbanpolitico.blogspot.com/2009/05/separate-but-equal-segregated-high.html or how many amply qualified Blacks in this day and age still have to prove their legitimacy, their worth, and their intellectual capital due to the supposed deleterious effects of Affirmative Action against Whites and Asians among other socially draining programs that are bringing down the curve of American culture.

The worst part of is that I know relatives who lived during Jim Crow. I know my roots are from Slaves and Maroons and I am grateful for the freedoms that I have, but it is ridiculous that I have to prove myself to non-blacks and that means I have to prove my intelligence, my humanity and worth to those who automatically assume that I am inferior and a drain on humanity. This double life and near schizophrenic pretzel twist mind f*ck will turn any well intentioned Black person either angry or bitter, or in such deep denial about themselves, that they lose all semblance of their culture and identity.

Nevertheless, at the very least African and Caribbean immigrants have a superior edge to America blacks and that is they have a home culture to go back to, especially when things get rough in the states. They have rich traditions and the luxury of living in a majority culture of people who look like them and run the gamut of diversity in their societies from pauper, sinner, to high flown success and to not be beaten down every day by people reminding you of your inferiority. Black Americans are stuck having to fend off accusations of their inhumanity as minorities in which we are at once invisible yet often covertly or openly vilified.

It just disgust me that how unconscious and how imbued into the culture like some Pavlovian notion that many non-Blacks and some Blacks for that matter honestly believe that most black americans have low intelligence, are more prone to violence crime and depravity than any other group, lack the physical beauty of other races and are just a great deal more savage and unformed compared to everyone else. It such an integral part of American and by extension Western culture that immigrants who have no knowledge of Black people can so easily adopt and except these notions as fact. It also angers me that this huge crap of assumptions is something that I have to wade through in my everyday life because it is somehow my unenviable burden to prove to others that I am a mere exception instead of the rule.

Grata said...

"This double life and near schizophrenic pretzel twist mind f*ck will turn any well intentioned Black person either angry or bitter, or in such deep denial about themselves, that they lose all semblance of their culture and identity."

I think Michael Jackson is a perfect example of the impact this society can have on a Black person. I am amazed at how many people wonder why he mutilated himself to look like what he did in the end. I thought it was obvious to everyone why a black person could get so twisted given this environment but even whites are in denial about the potential damage their system has on a Black individual.


"Nevertheless, at the very least African and Caribbean immigrants have a superior edge to America blacks and that is they have a home culture to go back to, especially when things get rough in the states."

The advantage foreign blacks have can not be overestimated. I always encourage AAs to travel and move out of America and taste the difference in being in a majority Black nation. Most who do are never the same again.

FunkyStarkitty50 said...

^^ To Grata: I have many African friends who live here and they tell me how it different/better it is back home.My friends from Ghana, the Ivory Coast, Senegal and Liberia already have land that they are planning to build on once they get sick of living here. The only thing they do like about living in the States is the Entrepreneurial spirit it seems to encourage. Most of them have their own businesses and say they would have had a harder time being successful business owners back home than here. Otherwise, they can't believe how dysfunctional the racial climate here is. Being around them helps me to see what a confident and empowered group of people look like. I do gather from some of them that they think that Black Americans are weak and need more of a sense of self, a backbone. They are probably right.

Boom said...

There's no denying that we have our issues but we have never and never will be weak.

Grata said...

"do gather from some of them that they think that Black Americans are weak and need more of a sense of self, a backbone. They are probably right."

That is what many non native blacks will say if they have not taken time to grasp the issues. Some of it is just pure arrogance.

By the way if you move around some African counries there are disenfranchised tribes or groups that display that same behavior as the AA stereotype. Those groups are at the bottom of the totem pole. Their men favor the women of the dominant group etc

Knowing what I know about this country, and I appreciate some aspects of it, I would never wish to be born here as a Black person.

As for those Africans that intend to go back home. I always find it funny when people ask Africans why they are here. Many people assume that Africans hate their homelands so much and that is why they are in America.

Everyone I know intends to go back. The realities of Africa are worlds apart from what is commonly perceived and even as an AA if you went there you would see why many would die to protect their homelands.

One huge advantage foreign blacks have is a space they can call their own, where no one is going to patronize, condescend or even dehumanize you because of your skin color. That is a BIG thing. They can only do it in their broadcasts around the world which is also dangerous in a way but they are not your banker, your doctor, store clerk, policeman etc. In otherwords you don't have to encounter them on a daily basis. For a Black person,that is a very good thing.

Black Americans don't have that space and the tendency now seems to be trying to get rid of the few that remain. I can't understand why anyone would want to assimilate into a group of people that we know will never see you as anything but a black person. I just don't get it.

After encountering all these people everywhere I go, I don't want to see them in my private social life. The individual friends that I have are genuinely good human beings and those that cross a line, I get rid of immediately. I can't have my humanity questioned by those supposedly close to me.

So I am always scratching my head over efforts to socially assimilate, it doesn't make sense. To most non Black people, the Black person is inferior regardless of what they try to put on. This is a constant.

Foreign Blacks especially Africans understand this extremely well. I have met Africans that have mastered this concept. On the surface they appear gullible and stupid. But deep down they clearly understand the way they are perceived and navigate the world with that in mind. And they make no effort to change people's mind towards them.

RainaHavock said...

Am I racist? Hmmm....I don't know about that. Am I prejudice...Hell yes. When I was younger. "Oh everybody can't be that bad. This a new day." Now I'm in the "I need to watch these white people because I don't know what they up to" kind of phase. weird I know because I'm in the goth lifestyle but even still most of the goths I hang around with or have met are minorities. Those people who think this world is color blind are truly looking through rose colored glasses.

Anonymous said...

I have to admit that when I see white liberals, I mentally lock my doors. I've met too many who celebrate people who stand up for their rights--as long as the ones standing up for their rights are in other parts of the world or are dead and in history books.

What I have said about white liberals can be applied to professionals in the academic world. I am a white transgender woman who's teaching in a college in which the student body is 80 percent black and 10 percent South Asian. My gender identity is known. I have never had a problem with a student: All of the trouble I've had has come from administrators and a few faculty members.

I can well understand how a person of color can hold some of the prejudices siddity describes, for I have some of them myself.

扒Elly said...

I'm a racist as well if you're considered a racist cause I know for a fact that quite a few people believe a couple of the "generalizations" you made. I know i do.
Great post as usual.

Dark Moon said...

The advantage foreign blacks have can not be overestimated. I always encourage AAs to travel and move out of America and taste the difference in being in a majority Black nation. Most who do are never the same again.

Quite true. But I wonder how welcoming others would be of Blacks invading their group spaces. I seriously doubt if they would see us as anything other than diffident outsiders.

The denigration of other groups and races against Black Americans rings hollow when they have a failsafe in not only being majority in their own countries, but they already have an established culture and traditions that has typically been resistant to assimilation and denigration by White people. Africans, Caribbean’s, Asians and Jews etc. have only to worry about conserving their culture while successfully being accommodating to Whites without isolating themselves in which they are deemed a threat to the majority culture, whereas Blacks are still in survival mode in that we are in a life and death struggle for the basic necessities and trying to construct a culture that has been irreparably damaged by Slavery, Jim Crow and the insidious belief of Black inferiority by every single race on the planet.

It may seem like hyperbolic paranoid rantings but it never fails how shocked non-Blacks are that there is diversity, native intelligence and dynamism within Black cultures, especially Black American culture and that there is always rationalization used to discount Black exceptionalism and emphasize Black pathology.

The ironic point is how afraid most groups are of Blacks gathering and trying to form a coherent voice. Being disparate or working towards assimilation while sacrificing group identity is the one way that Black Americans will be controlled, especially since so many Black Americans buy into rugged individualism as the only means to succeed in America. We will destroy each other in order to be seen as either safe and or successful by whites, whereas most groups implicitly understand the importance of promoting their own group interests and only play lip service to superior abilities of one individual. Even Whites understand this American fable and often close ranks with each other.

Sugabelly said...

@Dark Moon: Possibly Black Americans could try assimilating into a chosen African culture. Learning the language would immediately give them a sense of a world to which they can retreat from the every day realities of being Black in America.

I know if I could speak only English I would lose my mind. I go to school in America and when it gets too crazy I can completely shut the world out by speaking in Igbo with other Igbo Nigerians.

Dark Moon said...

@Dark Moon: Possibly Black Americans could try assimilating into a chosen African culture. Learning the language would immediately give them a sense of a world to which they can retreat from the every day realities of being Black in America.

I know if I could speak only English I would lose my mind. I go to school in America and when it gets too crazy I can completely shut the world out by speaking in Igbo with other Igbo Nigerians.


Sugarbelly (great avatar by the way) that certainly sounds reasonable and a noble effort that makes sense in an attempt at cultural healing, however Blacks have tried back to Africa movements from Marcus Garvey to the 60’s and 70’s which some Africans saw as nothing more than misguided appropriation of African names and the Kente cloth. I had a relative who was set to move to Ghana in order to be around Africans, yet many of these movements have failed due to disinterest from Blacks and the mixed reviews from Africans towards Black efforts.

I don’t think Africans can truly comprehend the painful disconnect that Black Americans have of not really knowing what part of Africa they come from. That is something that no DNA test, if accurate, can ever fix. That explains why we hold on so strongly to America. There is nowhere else to go or belong to. In addition, just as Africans find Black American ignorance stupefying, Africans are equally far less welcoming of Black Americans, “orphans and outcasts” (I have been told) trying to adopt and become a part of them. We are the ultimate outsider—we are of African origin but it would be difficult to find an ethnic group in Africa who would welcome a Black American as one of them. I believe that many non-Whites are far more accommodating to Whites interests and attempts to assimilate into their culture as opposed to Black.

Your right though, language and culture are a unifying and humanizing force that engenders pride and knowing where you belong.

Sugabelly said...

@Dark Moon: So I find that the reason it doesn't work a lot of the time is Black American Disinterest. A lot of the Black Americans I have met like the idea of claiming Africa just so they can say they are descended from kings and whatnot but are not really interested in learning anything about African cultures, languages or people. It's so bad that they are not even willing to give up their stereotypes of Africans no matter how inaccurate.

Black Americans have a rare opportunity in Africa to find refuge from the oppressive reality of being Black in America but most refuse to take it.

Most Black Americans know little to nothing about Africa and the little they know is terribly wrong. Like someone else here said, even White people know far more about Africa than Black Americans do.

Unfortunately, I have encountered FAR MORE racism and prejudice from Black Americans than from Whites since I have been in America. They are extremely hostile towards me because I speak British English and four other languages. They resent me because I have a sense of identity that they will never have and whatever ignorance I experience from Whites, or even people of other races rolls off me like water off a duck because I am secure in who I am and I know that I can always go back to MY country and MY people where I come first if I get tired of the American foolishness.

Black Americans don't have a choice like I do and I get that. Yet, I see a wasted opportunity. Those Black girls at my school, rather than hating me, they could have asked me to teach them my language (I would have happily obliged) and they would have been better for it.

What Black Americans do not understand is that Black, Brown or Yellow (if you're Black) skin colour means NOTHING to Africans. Because we all look alike, there are far more important things that differentiate us like LANGUAGE, CULTURE, RELIGION, TRIBE, etc but for Black Americans, being Black automatically makes you a member of the group so I can understand the confusion when they find that Africans don't automatically identify with them immediately.

My point is, Black Americans need an escape plan, and the only logical escape plan is Africa. Honestly, just being able to speak a different language opens up a whole new world you never knew existed and pretty soon you'll be asking yourself why you put up with all that foolish racism for so long.

I didn't become a Black person until I came to America. Before I came here, I was Igbo and then I was a Nigerian, then I came to America and suddenly I'm Black.

I thank God every day that I was born Nigerian because sometimes I witness racism here and I realise how lucky I am to have been born in a country where everyone is Black and the upper class is Black, and the rich people are all Black, and the role models, and the celebrities and the actors, and the people on TV ALL look like ME.

It does wonders for self esteem.

Sugabelly said...

@Dark Moon: Sorry I sort of rambled in my last comment but let me be more specific here.

I think part of the reason why Black Americans might find it hard to be adopted into a particular African tribe is because they do not make enough effort.

What do I mean by effort?

-Learning to speak the language of the tribe to at least near fluency.

-Learning the customs and culture and actually abiding by them

A lot of Africans think that a lot of Black Americans like to claim Africa for show - just so they can wear the pretty clothes and fill their houses with the pretty sculptures and look pretty but for the most part we strongly doubt that most of the Black Americans that claim Africa would make an effort to learn and implement any of our cultures and THAT IS WHY they meet resistance over this issue.

We take our traditions and culture VERY seriously and any African is always pained to see their culture or language being made a mockery of.

Let me give you an example. I met this Black American lady at a fair who told me that she was a follower of the Ifa religion in Nigeria and had just returned from a trip to Osun (in Nigeria) where she had been baptized Ayofemi (Yoruba Nigerian name). We spoke at length and then one of her friends came over, and in greeting she said to her "Lafiya."

I was confused and so I asked her why she said that to the lady, and she told me that she was saying Good Afternoon in Yoruba to her.

I was shocked and so I informed her that "Lafiya" is not a Yoruba word but a HAUSA word, neither does it mean 'Good Afternoon' in Yoruba. I then told her the proper Yoruba greetings.

Ekaaro - Good morning
Ekaasan - Good afternoon
Ekaabo - Good evening.

I then went further and explained to her that:

Alafia ni means I am fine thank you while "Lafiya" is part of a HAUSA greeting,

i.e.

Ina kwana? Lafiya Lau.
Ina Gajiya? Lafiya Lau, etc.

I met this same lady at another fair yesterday. Guess what she said to me and someone else?

"Lafiya".

Africans don't like people messing up their language or culture. I am not saying Black Americans do that, but I am saying that if you're going to do it, then do it properly.

For the same reason we don't like it when people mispronounce our names because pretty often a slight change in pronunciation changes the entire meaning of the name.

Take the meaning of my mother's name for instance.

Pronunciation #1: The world is beautiful

Pronunciation #2: The pig is beautiful.

I think you see where this is going. That lady who claimed to be a Yoruba follower was totally sloppy about it and didn't really care that she was getting it all wrong and messing stuff up.

Stuff like that just kinda grates on our nerves. It's like she's just doing it because it looks glamourous ya know? Not because it really means anything to her.. which can be annoying.

Anonymous said...

Grata I always like what you have to say. I don't agree though about blacks in America not having our own space. To me this country, the USA, belongs to me just as much as any white person. I don't feel like a stranger here and that I don't belong. My people built this country and without us America would not be where she is today. The blood, sweat, and tears of my ancestors are in the soil that grew the trees that bore the fruit that we all continue to eat off of today. I will never ever let anyone tell me this is not my country. It's all mine. Every patch of it. It's yours too Grata, you are a citizen. You work and you pay taxes this country is yours too.

SIMONE

Yanmommasaid said...

No offense Dark Moon & Sugabelly but I am perfectly happy right here in my country. In my home. No escape plan needed. No reason to envy anyone from subjectively greener pastures. Everything and everyone I have ever known and loved is right here. Why would I ever let some ignorant morons chase me away from my home?

I used to be more pessimistic about race relations when I was younger. Inspired by Richard Wright and Josephine Baker, I took French for 5 years in middle school and high school with the intention of eventually running away to Paris where race would not be an issue (yeah right). What's changed over the past 15 years? Well the more attention you give to something, the bigger and more important it gets. And that's what I experienced; the more I read books, articles, and blogs where race relations were discussed and dissected constantly, the more paranoid I became about the unknown racists around the corner, in the next cubicle, bringing me my food in the restaurant. It really gets exhausting.

I don't read those things as much as I used to anymore. Life just got in the way. And I realized that most people are decent human beings who have better things to do than try to make sure my life as a black person in America is a horrible experience. I also realized that when I do encounter someone who comes across as a jerk, I most often have no proof that it's because of my race. They could be having a bad day or they just have a gruff manner but mean no harm, or they could just be a jerk. Most likely I'll never know, so usually I give them the benefit of the doubt instead of jumping to the conclusion that's going to cause me needless anxiety.

Usually (note I did not write never!) I don't bother arguing with people like "Nick" formerly known as "Amanda" formerly known as "Jovent". I saw too much of myself in this cartoon. Also, I've never met anyone who openly expressed such overtly racist views in real life. I know they exist but for the most part the only place they have left to air their beliefs is in anonymous venues on the internet. The only power they have is getting a few black readers to waste their time trying to convince some imbecile of their inherent humanity and worth as black people. And it is a waste of time since that person just as likely doesn't even believe the things they are writing but takes perverse enjoyment out of riling folks up. That's just the nature of trolls.

If they do actually believe it, they are not going to be swayed by anything any of us writes and they get the bonus of directing the conversation to what THEY wanted to talk about and away from what we were talking about. And who cares if they actually believe what they wrote? They obviously have nothing more productive to do with their time and that means they are not running anything. They have no more power, influence, or impact than a gnat over my capacity to get an education, a great job, a loving spouse, or anything else I want in life and indeed I have all of those things. Well...working on the spouse part. So f em. Life is good.

Dark Moon said...

No offense Dark Moon & Sugabelly but I am perfectly happy right here in my country. In my home. No escape plan needed. No reason to envy anyone from subjectively greener pastures. Everything and everyone I have ever known and loved is right here. Why would I ever let some ignorant morons chase me away from my home........

My premise (and I should have qualified my original statements with some Blacks) was not an actual back to Africa movement but a spiritual connection to African roots. After all, many Blacks make a concerted effort to trace the European and Native American ancestry and will often overemphasize that part to appear less black as well as more exotic, and acceptable to the majority culture. The African portion is unknowable because most Black Americans cannot really pinpoint what specific tribe we originated from and being that most groups have a general antipathy to Black Americans, with obvious exception, it makes sense that some Blacks would want to connect to a people that look similar to them. Moreover, the majority of our physical make-up is Black, thus why do we make tortuous claims to the contrary when many of the traits that make us stand out come from West Africa. In addition, the listlessness and nihilism that pervades Black culture is directly proportional to the majority culture seeing Black as less than and the fact that our culture often doesn’t provide the necessary uplift and support that many other racial and ethnic groups provide to each other.

Naturally, Randal Robinson in Quitting America came to the very same conclusion that grata and honeybelle brought up, by looking for a cultural and social asylum and thus he ultimately left America for good and relocated to St Kitts. His book was created in Anger at having to fight for rights, and his own humanity in which Whites and other non-Blacks continually thwarted his right to belong and to be considered an integral part of America. Naturally he understands that drastic physical relocation is something that most Blacks would not do, but it seems important to create a space of solace in which your race and culture can be a source of inspiration instead of always having to fight to be seen as human.

Of course, the beauty of the Black community is its diversity and it is admirable that you never had to deal first hand with discrimination and racism. You are able to ignore and dispose of its effects which have given you peace of mind, however there are some of us that have experienced overt expressions of racism and discrimination and thus it does alter your perceptions of the dominant group. I grew up in a poorer working class neighborhood in which the white next door neighbors referred to us as simply niggers. I went to an all white school in which neo nazi’s and white pride rallies were openly promoted by other students. Walking home from school was a nightmare. I had to prove to my white teacher that I belonged to a gifted summer program because he honestly believed I only got in due to race. I had to fight a housing discrimination case, etc. etc. Thus even though I grew up in the 80’s and 90’s these experiences weren’t overreacting or I’m gonnna hate whitey no matter. It may seem small potatoes, but they have knocked off the rose tinted glasses long ago.

I do however agree that it is a waste of time trying to convince others about Black people and their diversity, which is why adhering to a common culture that is nurturing rather than pathological is the best way to combat the negative effects of living as a minority in a hostile environment. I do think that Blacks, especially Black women should support one another more and to work towards uplifting themselves and to stop trying to convince whites and others that you are the exception, the good black> it does get tiring and it is ultimately a fruitless exercise, which is why it is perfectly understandable to procced with caution. Many Whites and non-Blacks do it, why must Blacks always accept others wiith open arms.

Dark Moon said...

@Dark Moon: So I find that the reason it doesn't work a lot of the time is Black American Disinterest. A lot of the Black Americans I have met like the idea of claiming Africa just so they can say they are descended from kings and whatnot but are not really interested in learning anything about African cultures, languages or people. It's so bad that they are not even willing to give up their stereotypes of Africans no matter how inaccurate.

Black Americans have a rare opportunity in Africa to find refuge from the oppressive reality of being Black in America but most refuse to take it.

Most Black Americans know little to nothing about Africa and the little they know is terribly wrong. Like someone else here said, even White people know far more about Africa than Black Americans do.

Unfortunately, I have encountered FAR MORE racism and prejudice from Black Americans than from Whites since I have been in America. They are extremely hostile towards me because I speak British English and four other languages. They resent me because I have a sense of identity that they will never have and whatever ignorance I experience from Whites, or even people of other races rolls off me like water off a duck because I am secure in who I am and I know that I can always go back to MY country and MY people where I come first if I get tired of the American foolishness.


Sugarbelly, I do agree that blacks should open their horizons more and I am truly sorry about your experiences with Black Americans. I do agree with you about the importance of a soul or cultural asylum of which to gain strength purpose and pride and just being open, willing to learn and being respectful of the culture. I do think however that many blacks take some of the worse traits of American culture that emphasizes isolationism and a arrogant disinterest in other cultures and groups outside of American borders and I think to that if Blacks are so willing to put in the time and effort to uncover a long lost Native American ancestor or White slave owner than they should be willing to take a less jaundiced eye to their African roots without alternating between naive glorification or ignorant derision. Many of our traditions and cultural come from Africa thus I do think it’s a shame that we don’t show more interest and empathy to the continent and its peoples. My father for example gave me and my siblings’ African names and he was an amateur African historian, had eclectic taste in West African art and was very respectful of West African culture in general, but I realize he was probably rare.

Still it would be great if Africans understood the special challenges that Black Americans face and how they are hugely advantaged by already having a secure and unshakeable identity and they can leave when they see fit. I think both sides suffer from White adulation to some degree either through colonialization or cultural domination, but I am less optimistic that there will be a positive and worthwhile pan African dialogue. There is too much time that has been lost. Maybe things may change 25 years from now.

Leo Princess said...

I read your post and, while it is meaningful and honest, there's just one question that keeps popping up in my mind: are those photos for real? The first one looks like a spoof, but the second one gives me the creeps.

Menelik Charles said...

Dark Moon said:

if Africans understood the special challenges that Black Americans face and how they are hugely advantaged by already having a secure and unshakeable identity and they can leave when they see fit.

I think both sides suffer from White adulation to some degree...

Menelik says:

I couldn't have put it better myself! You are sista in both body and mind!

Menelik Charles
London England

lamocosa said...

Mexicans are the most racist Hispanics? Really? I used to go to Mexico (from tiny rural villages to Mexico City)every summer and I never had any issues. Argentinians? Yes. Cubans? Sure. Dominicans? Long, twisted historical road of racisim. Maybe its the Texas Mexicans.

Kwesi said...

@ Dark Moon,

your great! please set up your own blog so I can read your wise words more often.

Love

Kwesi said...

@ Dark Moon,

your great! please set up your own blog so I can read your wise words more often.

Love

S. said...

In response to Anonymous' comment (July 4, 2009 8:07 AM):
"I will admit. I get tired. I get tired of always making sure I put in the extra effort so that white people know that they can feel comfortable around me because I am not a threat or that I am not angry, that I am friendly, very compassionate, accepting, and I try and listen and be supportive to just about everyone if they are deserving. I get tired because I sometimes feel like why can't we all just be human to each other."

Bending over backwards just in order to get basic respect is not the way to go. I say this b/c that is they way I used to be. I thought if I could show that I spoke a certain way or went out of my way to not be assertive or confrontational, I would not be seen as a "threat." However, certain races would then see this as an opportunity to say things they shouldn’t be saying b/c they believe you won’t call them out. This resulted in me being disrespected and allowing myself to be a doormat.

Why should one person do all the accommodating and adjusting while the other gets to stand there with all their prejudices? I realized it is too tiring & that I will just be myself. Take it or leave it. You end up losing more than gaining when you try too hard to appease people (in any situation, race-related or not).

Grata said...

"Grata I always like what you have to say. I don't agree though about blacks in America not having our own space. To me this country, the USA, belongs to me just as much as any white person. I don't feel like a stranger here and that I don't belong. My people built this country and without us America would not be where she is today. The blood, sweat, and tears of my ancestors are in the soil that grew the trees that bore the fruit that we all continue to eat off of today. I will never ever let anyone tell me this is not my country. It's all mine. Every patch of it. It's yours too Grata, you are a citizen. You work and you pay taxes this country is yours too."


Anon,

I may not have made my point as clear as intended. America belongs to anyone that is a citizen. Including myself. But as a Black person you know where your place is in this great nation. You are not entirely free. Even if you try to escape your race to conform, you are not really free.
It will take ages for real acceptance by Black people in this society. Its that reality that makes me conclude that a Black person in this country does not have a place of their own, away from the madness. I have a place I can go to not to deal with the madness. Black America has been pushing for assimilation and are succeding only physically though forcefully.

When I say Black America does not have a place of its own, its that place you go to and don't have to deal with the pressures of the White supremist system. Its simply not there.

Grata said...

"I grew up in a poorer working class neighborhood in which the white next door neighbors referred to us as simply niggers."


This is key. I am happy for those that don't make race issues part of their daily experience. It is quite an achievement in this society.

I have however realized that the acts of racism are varied. From the obvious egregious ones to the subconscious. And as a Black person, your socio-economic standing exposes you to the varying kinds. The higher up the socio-econ ladder the more subtle the racism becomes. But even that is never a guarantee. Just look at what Obama has to deal with.
If you are poor and you are going to get the more blatant racism. I have expereinced this kind first hand working odd jobs in my first years in America. I have shared how I was the only one in my department made to work in 100 degree tempratures because I was "stronger" than my Latino and white work mates.
As my job prospects became better the racism became more suubtle but obvious nonetheless. Where I am now, happily, its still there but because they have just suffered a Law suit from a Black guy, there is not much one can do. But you can still sense it. You catch people talking unware or they try to tell you how different you are etc. It just never goes away.
The key thing is not to pretend it doesn't exist but learning how to deal with it.

What I have personally found useful is try and see as much humanity in the people I encounter even if I know they don't see mine. That is quite a challenge but it helps fight off the so called paranoia.
When you extend that courtesy even mentally, you tend to see who they really are and the racist is very obvious to spot.

So I don't think I can ever bury my head in the sand on racism because I know that those at the lower rangs are getting the real brutal racist treatment. And those at the top are still getting it albeit in a different form. Though in the case of the Obama's some of it is not subltle at all.

Many times we think people who have made it above and beyond don't get affected but they also do get their wakeup calls that remind them this thing is far form gone. Oprah got it with that department store incident, atleast she called it that. MJ did it with Sony, the Obama's know it too well.

Obama has to keep reminding people, even reporters that he is the President. Why do you think that is?
Giving people the benefit of doubt? Hmmmm. I have long concluded that racism against Blacks is almost wired in non Black people. The best we can do is stop them from acting it out to deprive one of Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Grata said...

"I saw too much of myself in this cartoon."

Yan,

Are you refering to me?

Yanmommasaid said...

Grata,

I was referring to the person I referenced in that sentence: myself.

Ronia said...

I try very hard to remain neutral. I believe it is important--- above all other considerations--- to approach people as individuals, without preconceived notions.

But in my line of work, I see a lot of statistics that prove the world simply doesn't work in that fashion. There is a global racial hierarchy, and the world over, Blacks are at the bottom. It's difficult, knowing the things I do, not to develop the mindset of "They're all out to get me".

I hadn't realized that I was carrying a load of self-defeating prejudice around with me until my partner (who is White) pointed out that I have never attended my own award ceremonies, and that I hide away my plaques, honours, and other achievements in drawers as though I am ashamed of them.

I suppose the accusations of being an affirmative action token made me bitter, and by not addressing that bitterness, I internalized it, and let it simmer close to racial hatred.

Like you, Siddity, I believe that people have to admit their prejudice before they can address it. I don't think it will necessarily change the world at large, but in societies where racism and prejudice are open issues, it is more likely that people are willing to alter their views for a SINGLE individual (Olaudah Equiano comes to mind).

The phrase "You're not like the rest of them", to my mind, isn't really an insult. I see it as the first step an individual takes toward anti-collectivism, toward seeing people as individuals rather than part of a phenotypic herd. And those small steps, I think, will get us a lot closer to racial harmony than all the diversicrat nonsense currently on offer.

Grata said...

"I was referring to the person I referenced in that sentence: myself."

Yan,

Are you aware that you linked to my site after that statement?

Yanmommasaid said...

Well that's odd b/c the link in my comment takes me back to this same post on Siditty's blog. It was supposed to go to this http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/duty_calls.png.

dieselsandwich said...

I would call it prejudice, just to avoid confusion. Racism as a sociological term is used to describe systemic prejudice that possesses a greater impact through the power and privilege of a racial majority.

But yeah, you're right, prejudice is present in pretty much any group and revealing and taking responsibility for our prejudices are the best way to compensate for or even solve them.

I know that I have some deep seated fear of black people I don't know and this is racism (sociologically too, as I'm white) and prejudice. For the longest time, I wouldn't date black people because I couldn't feel safe enough around them to establish relationship levels trust.

It's something I own up to (as unpleasant a thought as it is) because if I don't, it will rule me and affect my actions towards others. And that's what's unacceptable. Things have gotten better. I've worked past some of my issues. But there's a lot more to deal with.

@ the people saying that being wary of white folk and judging them automatically as racist as a precautionary measure is not prejudiced: No. That is untrue.

Your wariness might be encouraged by experience but it is still prejudice. Just as a white person who reacts fearfully towards black people because most of the black people he or she knew were involved in gang violence is still prejudiced. Experience does not make it anything other than what it is. I'm glad that it helps keep you safe, but that doesn't change what it is. Prejudice.

Zach said...

I live in Indianapolis and my friends and I are mostly black and white. We all get along and really just don't think about the differences between us. Thinking to much about it is what gets you thinking the wrong way. Of course we joke to each other about the common stereotypes but it is in a respectful way. I am white and I honestly wish I didn't have that stigma that I think I am better than everyone else. A pretentious attitude is an individual quality that people attain from the environment they grow up in. Also I enjoy hearing about the different ways people are raised and the different things they are taught to believe, the more you learn, the less prejudice you are, if you asked me.